Shonna Trinch

Shonna Trinch

Primary Field
Linguistic Anthropology
Individual Type
Faculty
Position
Professor
http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/departments/anthropology/about_us.php
Professor, CUNY - John Jay College, Department of Anthropology
E-mail
vCard
Knowledge / Expertise
Interest/Specialty Areas Language, linguistics, domestic violence, rape, gender-related violence, gentrification
Geographic Area(s) of Expertise U.S. Southwest, Spain, Brooklyn, NY
Biography

<p>Shonna Trinch is a professor of Linguistic Anthropology. She received her PhD from the University of Pittsburgh in Spanish Linguistics. Professor Trinch is a faculty member at John Jay College of Criminal Justice where she teaches courses such as Forensic Linguistics, Sex and Culture, Language and Culture, Writing for a Multicultural World, and Seeing Rape. In addition to her work on gender-based violence, Shonna has been studying gentrification in Brooklyn, NY, and this June 2020, her new book <em>What the Signs Say: Language, Gentrification and Place-Making in Brooklyn</em> (with Edward Snajdr) was published with Vanderbilt University Press. This book shows how systemic racism in the &lsquo;liberal city&rsquo; creates a place where social hierarchies are written on the land, at the same time, it suggests what came before gentrification acted as a model of inclusion where there was a place for everyone.</p><p>Professor Trinch is the co-founder (with Barbara Cassidy) of <em>Seeing Rape</em> a public Anthropology project of student-led theater that has sexual justice and the eradication of rape from college campuses as its mission. To date, <em>Seeing Rape</em> has produced and directed more than 80 plays written by 103 different students for audiences now totaling more than 17,780 of their peers.</p><p>&nbsp;Shonna has also conducted fieldwork in the U.S. Southwest where she spent 13 months studying the ways in which Latina women and sociolegal authorities in 10 different institutional settings collaborate and conflict in the creation of narratives of domestic abuse. Based on this legal ethnography, her first book, <em>Latinas&rsquo; narratives of domestic abuse: Discrepant versions of violence</em> (John Benjamins, 2003) investigates how women&rsquo;s stories of domestic abuse and rape change and are changed, as they are cast by legal professionals from one speech genre into another. With a focus on language, Professor Trinch&rsquo;s many publications examine an array of issues that would be of interest to lawyers, law enforcement and victims&rsquo; advocates: &nbsp;the difference between advocacy and gatekeeping, the disruption of meaning in legal settings due to euphemism, the ways in which a witness-identity, as opposed to a victim-identity, is created in an affidavit and the high stakes linguistic consequences of interviewing women who have been victimized by gender violence.</p>

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Geographic Areas of Expertise United States
Northeast
New York
Southwest
Geographic Areas of Expertise International
Western Hemisphere
Languages
English
Spanish
Organizations
Curriculum Vitae
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